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justinejoli:

littlezombiekid:

the-uncensored-she:

Women should NOT be forced to feed their babies in a bathroom, all because we live in a misogynistic, porn-warped society that’s been brainwashed to believe that female breasts used for anything other than male pleasure is “indecent”. Support public breast feeding and end the porn culture.

Forever reblog

Having lived in NYC where its legal to be topless (and yes I took advantage of that fact several times.) I was curious as to why it wasn’t nation wide.

So let’s make it nation wide!

(Source: behance.net)

tashabilities:

artisansoulleader:

bitteroreo:

atane:

briteboy89:

pandifreyan:

mcgarrygirl78:

ceallaig1:

human-cartography:

kid-wiccan:

coming out to your parents

If you try for one second to tell me the X-Men isn’t an allegory for the gay rights movement, I will smack you. They weren’t even remotely subtle about this.

The mutants have always been an allegory for anyone that didn’t fit in to society. The folks who drew the comics made a point of that early on.

It’s not just the gay rights movement, its not just kids trying to “come out” to their parents.  Its people being mistreated by the government, put away, forced to pretend to be “normal”, systematically oppressed, even killed for who they are because the powers that be cant control it.  It’s an allegory for blacks, gays, the disabled (mentally and physically), women, and anyone really who isnt a white man at the top of the food chain.

Seriously guys… Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr are Professor X and Magneto. Legacy virus is HIV. X-men is a flawless comic.

Flawless commentary is flawless

Meh. Not this again.

People never get tired of reminding us of the allegories of the X-men and civil rights. I personally don’t care for allegories that consists of 2 powerful white men leading an ensemble of mostly powerful white people. I’m a comic lover and I understand the point Stan Lee and Jack Kirby were making. I enjoy X-men for what it is, a fantasy. I’m not going to use it for deep social commentary, despite the idealistic intentions of the creators.

I can see and listen to actual marginalized people. I’m on the margins myself and so is everyone around me and in my community. Allegories like this are for people who aren’t paying attention or listening to communities on the margins. I can’t imagine a Black lesbian for instance being excited about the X-men as an allegory for her life. I’ll make an educated guess and say that the only people who view allegorical narratives like the X-men as profound are probably white. I’m definitely not impressed by all powerful white characters used in place as allegories of systems put in place by real life powerful white people i.e. white supremacy.

The day when a white man shooting lasers from his eyes and an angry, furry dudebro with retractable adamantium claws start shedding light on my experiences as someone on the margins is the day when pigs fly.

Also, the allegory of Professor X as MLK Jr and Magneto as Malcolm X feeds into the dichotomy of one guy being respectable and the other being violent and ruthless. It is deeply flawed. People continue to promulgate this simplistic narrative of MLK Jr and Malcolm X and it’s dangerous. Magneto is a mutant who wants to destroy humankind (allegory for white people?) because he thinks mutants are superior. He is filled with hatred and contempt for humankind. He leads the “Brotherhood of Evil Mutants” (allegory for the Nation of Islam?).

Magneto’s sole purpose is ridding the world of humankind. That’s a horrible allegory of Malcolm X. That isn’t Malcolm X. That’s a white man’s interpretation of Malcolm X misrepresented as Magneto and his followers.

If Stan Lee and Jack Kirby wanted to really make a statement, they should have made the five original X-men Black since Black resistance to white supremacy was the preeminent struggle that inspired them. Forgive me for not giving a shit about their allegories when their inaugural champions of justice and vanguards of truth were white people. Even when inspired by Black resistance and Black suffering, the end result was still whiteness.

*Sips* BLOOP BLOOP.

^^^^^^^^

atane for president

(Source: sebastianslan)

(Source: ruinedchildhood)

durnesque-esque:

pothepolarbear:

Some people still think Beauxbatons was for girls and Durmstrang was for boys.

Well, the movie montage didn’t help with its parade of females pooping butterflies and men banging the floor with thinly veiled euphemisms.

Like it or not, the visual media has a greater impact on how people view book characters.

Case in point: all the people who managed to miss the blatant descriptions of Rue in The Hunger Games and didn’t realize she was black until they saw the movie.

With Harry Potter, there’s so much content that gets dropped because its just not possible to fit everything, so Hollywood framed the presentation of both schools to characterize their champion rather than going into detail about the school and campion individually.

zuky:

Let’s talk about the racist notion, deeply embedded in US culture, of Asians as perpetual foreigners. Specifically, maybe you heard about this massive facepalm from US Congress just last week.

At a congressional hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday, July 24, 2014, Florida Republican Congressman Curt Clawson (above, left) addressed Nisha Biswal (right) and Arun Kumar, two US citizens and senior officials working for the US State Department and US Commerce Department, with these words:

“I’m familiar with your country. I love your country. Anything I can do to make the relationship with India better, I’m willing and enthusiastic about doing so. Just as your capital is welcome here to produce good-paying jobs in the U.S., I’d like our capital to be welcome there. I ask cooperation and commitment and priority from your government in so doing.”

Needless to say, Biswal and Kumar are Indian Americans who hold senior position within the US government, and were introduced as such at the hearing, but the Tea Party Congressman repeatedly spoke to them about India as “your country” and “your government”. An incredibly awkward silence was finally broken when Biswal said: “I think your question is to the Indian government.”

ironvixen:

kumaton:

politicalsexkitten:

yukaryote:

Why Guys Like Asian Girls - Anna Akana

Everyone needs to watch this video. Now.

100% on point especially about men thinking that having “yellow fever” is a compliment and we’re supposed to be flattered by it. It’s the #1 way to parade around your blatant racism.

I want to be friends with her!

Thank god none of my ex had yellow fever.

"Do these guns look submissive to you?" Lol. I’d so say that.

Expired by Kerry Mansfield

Statement:

In elementary school I spent many lost afternoons hiding in the library nook reading while settled deeply into a green vinyl beanbag chair surrounded by the scent of musty paper. The first rite of passage upon learning how to write one’s name was to inscribe it on a library check-out card promising the book’s safe journey and return. I remember reading the list of names that had come before me and cradling the feeling that I was a part of this book’s history and it’s shared, communal experience exposed by curly-Q handwritten names and room assignments revealing repeat customers devouring the book beyond it’s deadline. An act of declaration that’s dissolving faster than we can see as cards are removed permanently and bar codes take their place.

The Japanese term “wabi-sabi” is described as the art of finding beauty in imperfection and of accepting the natural cycle of growth, decay and death. But unlike the American culture focused on spectacle, wabi-sabi is underplayed and modest, the kind of undeclared beauty that waits patiently to be discovered. It’s found in time-worn faces of expired library books that have traveled through many hands, and across county lines until they have reached their final resting place at ex-library warehouses where safe harbors are found in Costco-sized rows of “discards” and “withdrawns” rising within inches of the ceiling. 

The volumes documented in “Expired” serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It’s easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched. Now they have a new life, as portraits of the unique shared experience found only in a library book. We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing, unique communal experience offered by library books as it’s quickly replaced by downloads, finger screen-swipes and plastic newness. If you listen carefully you can hear the aching poetry calling from tattered pages that carry the burden of their years with dignity and grace.

(Source: bookporn)

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